Brave

Jun. 29th, 2012 09:35 pm
piasharn: (wall-E)
I just got back from seeing Pixar's Brave.

I don't bother to see movies in the theaters much anymore, because it just doesn't seem worth it, but I'm a Pixar fan and really excited about this one because OMG FEMALE PROTAGONIST! YES! FINALLY!

See, one of my biggest complaints with Pixar's movies was the lack of female leads. Oh, they've had some kickass female characters, but these characters were never the focus of the story. So I decided to spend the money and see it on the big screen.

You know what? I loved it. Not only did we finally get to see a brave, independent female lead, but, even better, there was no romance in the plot. (At least not for Merida, that is. Her parents are obviously happily married.) The story focuses on Merida, her life as a Princess in a mythical Scottish kingdom, and the conflict she feels about her duties to her clan and the fact that she'd rather be racing around the woods with her bow and arrows rather than learning more feminine behavior.

Yeah, the Princess-who-is-more-a-tomboy-than-a-lady thing has been done before, but Pixar really seems to have a knack for wonderful characterization (Oh, man... the interaction between Merida and her father was great. Plus, the heavier focus on the relationship between her and her mother was very touching.) and storytelling, so I'm not complaining. And I can't say that I've ever had anything bad to say about their artwork.

I know that there's wank going on about this film, because I've already come across entries on Tumblr about it. Parents wailing that they can't take their son to see this move, because what will they do if they admire a female character? The horror! It might even turn him - gasp! - GAY. Also, apparently the fact Merida isn't interested in getting married means that she's a lesbian, so clearly Pixar is totally promoting the Homosexual Agenda.

Yeah.

I'm going to wait and tackle those arguments later. I might actually try and write something up about the movie, it's portrayal of gender roles, and the response it's been getting. We'll see. Everyone here in the US is still flipping out over the Supreme Court's decision over health care reform, and given how many political blogs I follow, it's going to take a while before I can focus on much else.

Anyhow, in my opinion, Brave is much better than most of the other stuff that's been coming out lately (although The Hunger Games was decent) and actually worth the cost of a ticket.

One teensy not-quite-complaint: With all the running around and horse-riding Merida does, she'd spend half of the night getting her hair untangled. As someone who has long, crazy, curly hair like hers, I've learned this the hard way.



(Now that I think about it, I need some Brave userpics... Guess I'll use Wall-E for this entry since they're both Pixar movies.)

p.s. Stay until the very end of the credits.

Brave

Jun. 29th, 2012 09:35 pm
piasharn: (wall-E)
I just got back from seeing Pixar's Brave.

I don't bother to see movies in the theaters much anymore, because it just doesn't seem worth it, but I'm a Pixar fan and really excited about this one because OMG FEMALE PROTAGONIST! YES! FINALLY!

See, one of my biggest complaints with Pixar's movies was the lack of female leads. Oh, they've had some kickass female characters, but these characters were never the focus of the story. So I decided to spend the money and see it on the big screen.

You know what? I loved it. Not only did we finally get to see a brave, independent female lead, but, even better, there was no romance in the plot. (At least not for Merida, that is. Her parents are obviously happily married.) The story focuses on Merida, her life as a Princess in a mythical Scottish kingdom, and the conflict she feels about her duties to her clan and the fact that she'd rather be racing around the woods with her bow and arrows rather than learning more feminine behavior.

Yeah, the Princess-who-is-more-a-tomboy-than-a-lady thing has been done before, but Pixar really seems to have a knack for wonderful characterization (Oh, man... the interaction between Merida and her father was great. Plus, the heavier focus on the relationship between her and her mother was very touching.) and storytelling, so I'm not complaining. And I can't say that I've ever had anything bad to say about their artwork.

I know that there's wank going on about this film, because I've already come across entries on Tumblr about it. Parents wailing that they can't take their son to see this move, because what will they do if they admire a female character? The horror! It might even turn him - gasp! - GAY. Also, apparently the fact Merida isn't interested in getting married means that she's a lesbian, so clearly Pixar is totally promoting the Homosexual Agenda.

Yeah.

I'm going to wait and tackle those arguments later. I might actually try and write something up about the movie, it's portrayal of gender roles, and the response it's been getting. We'll see. Everyone here in the US is still flipping out over the Supreme Court's decision over health care reform, and given how many political blogs I follow, it's going to take a while before I can focus on much else.

Anyhow, in my opinion, Brave is much better than most of the other stuff that's been coming out lately (although The Hunger Games was decent) and actually worth the cost of a ticket.

One teensy not-quite-complaint: With all the running around and horse-riding Merida does, she'd spend half of the night getting her hair untangled. As someone who has long, crazy, curly hair like hers, I've learned this the hard way.



(Now that I think about it, I need some Brave userpics... Guess I'll use Wall-E for this entry since they're both Pixar movies.)

p.s. Stay until the very end of the credits.
piasharn: (Default)
A Quick Note: I'm actually not feeling as pissed off as this entry may make it seem. In reality, the following link had me snickering mightily, mostly because I didn't realize that people still hold those outdated views of women and men. I used the "bitchy" mood setting more for the feminine connotations and the irony than as a true representation of my current emotions.

You may now return to your regularly schedualed program...

So there's this guy named Kim du Toit (I'd never heard of him, either.) who writes rants and things of that nature. Anyhow, the lovely ladies at [livejournal.com profile] wildwomen directed me to this article of his, on "The Pussification of the Western Male". (His words, not mine.)

And... well... Is it just me, or does this guy have issues with the female sex?

Seriously. If he didn't have issues with women, why would he insult us left and right throughout the piece? He implies that there is something horrible about femininity in general, and that many of the qualities we associate with women (such as gentleness and compassion) are loathsome in males, and that we are denying young boys their inherant masculinity by teaching the that violence is bad.

Then he writes this:

"But most of all, I do this website because I love being a man. Amongst other things, I talk about guns, self-defense, politics, beautiful women, sports, warfare, hunting, and power tools -- all the things that being a man entails."

Wow.

Do I really need to comment. (By the way, since I am interested in forms of self-defense such as karate, politics, women and power-tools, does this make me a man too? Actually, the Gender Genie seems to think I'm a guy...)

I'm not kidding... this man thinks that the beginning of the end was allowing women the right to vote.

...

...

You know, I feel sorry for men. I really do. We have such a limited, rigid set of standards for masculinity. Women can break gender barriers with much more ease and social acceptance than their male counterparts. (Example: No one blinks when a women walks around in a suit. What happens when a man wears a dress? Outside of San Fransisco, that is.)

Anyhow, I've gotten a bit off track. I didn't actually mean to start in on the essay. Really.

I did, however, want to point you to this which blows the original article out of the water. (In my opinion, at least.)

"But du Toit’s essay is brilliant in a way he probably never intended—it’s a masterpiece of self-confirmation. His main thesis is that Western males are becoming wimps, and his essay itself proves that there is at least some truth in the thesis; never before in human history has there been so much puling and whining about such inconsequential irritations. Du Toit’s groundless blubbering is, in the end, itself a partial confirmation of his point. In fact, du Toit’s essay probably deserves to spawn a neologism: duToitification and its cognates. You become duToitified when you’ve got it so good that you lose all perspective on the world and as a result exaggerate minor unpleasantries into vexations of Biblican proportions. That is, you become an insufferable weenie."

Mr. du Toit, should you ever read this entry, I would like to point out that courage and self-reliance are not qualities only found in men, and that many "feminine" qualities should be valued just as much as their "masculine" counterparts. I agree that being a "sissy" is not a desirable trait, but to claim that women are all sissies is one of the most ignorant statements I have ever read.

As the proud owner of a pussy (Although the uterus-and-ovaries combo get on my nerves at times. I'm thinking about selling them on the Black Market.), I don't see the XX contigent gaining equal status to be the Sign of the Appocalypse that you evidently equate it with.

Then again, I'm a woman, so what do I know?

July 2012

S M T W T F S
12345 67
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 20th, 2017 07:32 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios